The World of MBTI and What You Can Gain From It

By Claire Gerber
12 September 2021

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Image created by C. Gerber on Canva

As a student gets ready for graduation, there is a lot of preparation to be done. Preparation for finals, college, maybe even moving out. There is one way of preparing for life after high school that most don’t consider, preparing yourself by knowing yourself, which is done by taking the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (or MBTI).  

 

The MBTI is an in-depth personality test developed by mother and daughter Katherine Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers. They developed the indicator by utilizing famous psychologist Carl Jung’s theories and first published the test in 1962.  

Compared to most personality tests, the MBTI tells students more than just the outer level of their personalities. It describes the building blocks of who they are as individuals.  

 

These building blocks are referred to as cognitive functions, and the way these functions interact with each other is different for each of the sixteen types (see graphic below) and they indicate why people do and say the things they do, what makes them tick, and even how they solve problems.  

 

It is crucial for students to understand these functions, because they will learn how to best communicate with others, and they may be surprised by what they discover or their learning types.  Students who learn about the personality types, will be able to spot certain traits in others, which will make communication a breeze.  

 

Communication is not the only important aspect (although it is key when entering new environments), it is also about self-knowledge. The MBTI will give students the opportunity to learn things about themselves that most people take years, even decades to learn.  

 

The world of MBTI is a great way toward self-discovery.  It can motivate its users to identify coping mechanisms and understand how to communicate better with others. MBTI users will even understand their natural strengths and weaknesses and how to work with them which will lead them to become balanced and happy individuals.  

 

It should be noted that it is recommended to take the test at a licensed professional, however, there are free tests that can give you an idea of what type you may be.  

Free tests:  

 

Other helpful resources:  

   

MBTI graphic by Claire Gerber